Luke Fretwell

Luke Fretwell is co-founder and CEO of ProudCity, and the founder of GovFresh. He advises civic leaders and businesses on how to best leverage digital strategies to create more effective, collaborative governments. He has written about government IT for Federal Computer Week, NextGov, FedScoop, StateScoop and FierceGovernment, and has been referenced by the Washington Post and Fast Company on civic technology issues. He has worked with a number of government-focused companies and media, including CivicActions, NuCivic and FedScoop and has been involved in broad-focused community efforts, such as GovPress, CityCamp, CivicMeet, Agile Government Leadership and Open Source for America. Connect with him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

What should governments require for their open data portals?

My fundamental suggestion is that government-run open data platforms be fully open source. There are a number of technical and procurement reasons for this, which I will address in the future, but I believe strongly that if the platform you’re hosting data on doesn’t adhere to the same licensing standards you hold for your data, you’re only doing open data half right.

Take the 2015 Agile Government Survey

Agile Government Leadership wants to learn more about the state of agile project management in government, its challenges and successes, and how AGL can better support the community.

California launches innovation contests to improve government operations

The state of California has launched a $25K Find a New Way innovation contest that gives residents a chance “to identify areas of improvement within the state government and share their untapped expertise to create solutions.”

7 books for better digital government

Continuing on my book cleaning spree, I wanted to highlight a few web product design and development books I’m getting rid of that are helpful for anyone focused on providing government digital services.

Keep plugging away

BallotPath founder Jim Cupples sent me a follow-up note, and it hits home two important points.

White House moves to a more integrated, mobile-friendly blog

The White House continues to roll out a better mobile experience with a newly-designed White House blog.

Bloomberg commits $42 million to scale government performance management, open data

As part of a new What Works Cities initiative, Bloomberg Philanthropies announced a $42 million effort to help 100 U.S. cities “elevate and accelerate” their “use of data and evidence to engage citizens, make government more effective, and improve people’s lives.”

Get 10% off Code for America Summit registration with GovFresh discount code

This year’s Code for America Summit is September 30 to October 2 in Oakland, California, and friends of GovFresh get a 10 percent discount.

How can we make GovFresh better?

I’ve created a GitHub repo to maintain feedback, comments and ideas anyone has related to GovFresh.

Federal CIO Council releases open data prioritization toolkit

The federal CIO Council’s Innovation Committee has published an open data prioritization workbook and toolkit, including a data inventory tracker and prioritization matrix, to help agencies best evaluate and prioritize data for release to the public.

Submit your question suggestions for ‘State of Agile Government’ survey

Agile Government Leadership is developing a “State of Agile Government” survey and is looking for feedback on best questions to ask.

Tennessee’s new logo

There is a lot of shortsighted chatter around the state of Tennessee’s new branding efforts and, while I don’t have a strong opinion on the logo aesthetics, which has received criticism for its $46,000 price tag, it’s important to commend the holistic approach to uniformity and why this will benefit residents (and taxpayers) in the future.

San Francisco publishes year two plan, continues to lead on open data

San Francisco’s DataSF team continues to quietly and effectively demonstrate what an efficient, holistic and personable approach to open data looks like with the announcement of its year two plan and retrospective of the past year.

5 a16z podcast episodes for government

I recently discovered Silicon Valley venture capital firm a16z’s podcast series, and it’s a sign of the times that a VC is leveraging media in a way that not just promotes their portfolio companies, but also addresses the government and regulatory affairs issues Silicon Valley, startups and technology companies increasingly face.

Feds publish guide to setting up an open source project

18F has published a guide that helps federal government workers standardize GitHub use and better leverage the social coding platform when setting up open source projects.

USPTO’s tech strategy is a blueprint for all government IT

I just discovered the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office strategic IT plan, which should serve as a blueprint for all government agency technology efforts.

GovDelivery expands government communications offering with Textizen acquisition

Government communications platform GovDelivery announced today it has acquired the civic engagement text messaging service Textizen to “promote citizen action, engagement, and behavior change.”

12 books for better government

I’m doing some spring cleaning and parting ways with a number of my beloved government-focused books. Before I do, I wanted to share the ones I’m letting go of that I highly recommend to those involved in re-thinking the way government works, and its changing role given the way the world is evolving.

Cities and startups

Fred Wilson’s talk with The New York Times reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin during the recent Cities for Tomorrow 2015 conference about how cities can create startup hubs is a must-watch for mayors.

The changing relationship between tech and government

Silicon Valley venture capital firm a16z hosts an excellent discussion with current Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and former mayor Adrian Fenty on its a16z Podcast series.